CEDP (Certified Emergency Disaster Professional) Certification

The International Board for Certification of Safety Managers, also known as BCHCM, was established in 1976 as a not-for-profit independent credentialing organization. The Board establishes certification and re-certification requirements for the Certified Emergency Disaster Professional (CEDP). The Board operates as an independent professional credentialing organization that is not affiliated with any other membership group, association, or lobbying body. The Board exists solely for the purpose of issuing individual certifications to qualified candidates. Our mission is to 'Upgrade the Profession' by offering real world and practical certifications.

 

CEDP Background  

IBFCSM launched the credential to meet the need for a practical but 'professional credential' for those working in the public, private, and governmental positions related to emergency/disaster management. Personnel serving in the following related functions may qualify to sit for the Exam: (1) emergency/disaster managers or coordinators, (2) public health department personnel including infection prevention professionals, (3) federal, state, and local governmental personnel performing emergency related responsibilities, (4) hazardous material managers, (5) first responders including fire and law enforcement professionals, (6) emergency medical technicians,  (7) emergency, safety, and management consultants, (8) occupational safety and health managers, (9) hazard control professionals, (10) private security officers,  (11) emergency  volunteers, and (12) any others who work in functions related to emergency and disaster management. The exam addresses emergency planning, management, response, and mitigation concepts. It also addresses emergency related standards and/or best practices from reliable sources including organizations such as:  FEMA, DHS, DHHS, NFPA, ASTM, ANSI, NRC, CDC, EPA, and OSHA.  Candidates can qualify at the Master Level exam by documenting at least eight (8) years of years of relevant experience and/or education in an emergency preparedness, response, or disaster related position. Please note that IBFCSM does not require candidates to have a four-year degree to qualify. However, college credits and degrees may be used by some candidates to help them qualify. Each 30 semester hours of college credits can substitute for one year of experience for a maximum of three years. Candidates with less than eight years of experience and/or education may qualify for at the Associate Level by documenting four years of education and/or experience.  Special consideration may be granted for candidates who have completed a bachelor's or master's degree in an Emergency Management, Disaster Management, or Homeland Security related discipline.

 

CEDP FEMA Core Capabilities

The CEDP Exam contains questions pertaining to all 31 Core Capabilities identified by FEMA. These capabilities are referenced in many national preparedness efforts, including the National Planning Frameworks. The Goal grouped the capabilities into five mission areas, based on where they most logically fit. Some fall into only one mission area, while some others apply to several mission areas. Listed below are descriptions of all 31 Core Capabilities.

 

 

1.    PLANNING

  • Mission Areas: All

  • Description: Conduct a systematic process engaging the whole community as appropriate in the development of executable strategic, operational, and/or community-based approaches to meet defined objectives.

2.    PUBLIC INFORMATION AND WARNING

  • Mission Areas: All

  • Description: Deliver coordinated, prompt, reliable, and actionable information to the whole community through the use of clear, consistent, accessible, and culturally and linguistically appropriate methods to effectively relay information regarding any threat or hazard, as well as the actions being taken and the assistance being made available, as appropriate.

3.    OPERATIONAL COORDINATION

  • Mission Areas: All

  • Description: Establish and maintain a unified and coordinated operational structure and process that appropriately integrates all critical stakeholders and supports the execution of core capabilities.

4.    FORENSICS AND ATTRIBUTION

  • Mission Area: Prevention

  • Description: Conduct forensic analysis and attribute terrorist acts (including the means and methods of terrorism) to their source, to include forensic analysis as well as attribution for an attack and for the preparation for an attack in an effort to prevent initial or follow-on acts and/or swiftly develop counter-options.

5.   INTELLIGENCE AND INFORMATION SHARING

  • Mission Areas: Prevention, Protection

  • Description: Provide timely, accurate, and actionable information resulting from the planning, direction, collection, exploitation, processing, analysis, production, dissemination, evaluation, and feedback of available information concerning threats to the United States, its people, property, or interests; the development, proliferation, or use of WMDs; or any other matter bearing on U.S. national or homeland security by Federal, state, local, and other stakeholders. Information sharing is the ability to exchange intelligence, information, data, or knowledge among Federal, state, local, or private sector entities, as appropriate.

6.    INTERDICTION AND DISRUPTION

  • Mission Areas: Prevention, Protection

  • Description: Delay, divert, intercept, halt, apprehend, or secure threats and/or hazards.

7.    SCREENING, SEARCH, AND DETECTION

  • Mission Areas: Prevention, Protection

  • Description: Identify, discover, or locate threats and/or hazards through active and passive surveillance and search procedures. This may include the use of systematic examinations and assessments, sensor technologies, or physical investigation and intelligence.

8.    ACCESS CONTROL AND IDENTITY VERIFICATION

  • Mission Area: Protection

  • Description: Apply a broad range of physical, technological, and cyber measures to control admittance to critical locations and systems, limiting access to authorized individuals to carry out legitimate activities.

9.    CYBERSECURITY

  • Mission Area: Protection

  • Description: Protect against damage to, the unauthorized use of, and/or the exploitation of (and, if needed, the restoration of) electronic communications systems and services (and the information contained therein).

10.   PHYSICAL PROTECTIVE MEASURES

  • Mission Area: Protection

  • Description: Reduce or mitigate risks, including actions targeted at threats, vulnerabilities, and/or consequences, by controlling movement and protecting borders, critical infrastructure, and the homeland.

11.  RISK MANAGEMENT FOR PROTECTION PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES

  • Mission Area: Protection

  • Description: Identify, assess, and prioritize risks to inform Protection activities and investments.

12.  SUPPLY CHAIN INTEGRITY AND SECURITY

  • Mission Area: Protection

  • Description: Strengthen the security and resilience of the supply chain.

13.  COMMUNITY RESILIENCE

  • Mission Area: Mitigation

  • Description: Lead the integrated effort to recognize, understand, communicate, plan, and address risks so that the community can develop a set of actions to accomplish Mitigation and improve resilience.

14.  LONG-TERM VULNERABILITY REDUCTION

  • Mission Area: Mitigation

  • Description: Build and sustain resilient systems, communities, and critical infrastructure and key resources lifelines so as to reduce their vulnerability to natural, technological, and human-caused incidents by lessening the likelihood, severity, and duration of the adverse consequences related to these incidents.

15.  RISK AND DISASTER RESILIENCE ASSESSMENT

  • Mission Area: Mitigation

  • Description: Assess risk and disaster resilience so that decision makers, responders, and community members can take informed action to reduce their entity's risk and increase their resilience.

16.  THREATS AND HAZARD IDENTIFICATION

  • Mission Area: Mitigation

  • Description: Identify the threats and hazards that occur in the geographic area; determine the frequency and magnitude; and incorporate this into analysis and planning processes so as to clearly understand the needs of a community or entity.

17.  CRITICAL TRANSPORTATION

  • Mission Area: Response

  • Description: Provide transportation (including infrastructure access and accessible transportation services) for response priority objectives, including the evacuation of people and animals, and the delivery of vital response personnel, equipment, and services into the affected areas.

18.  ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE/HEALTH AND SAFETY

  • Mission Area: Response

  • Description: Ensure the availability of guidance and resources to address all hazards including hazardous materials, acts of terrorism, and natural disasters in support of the responder operations and the affected communities.

19. FATALITY MANAGEMENT SERVICES

  • Mission Area: Response

  • Description: Provide fatality management services, including body recovery and victim identification, working with state and local authorities to provide temporary mortuary solutions, sharing information with mass care services for the purpose of reunifying family members and caregivers with missing persons/remains, and providing counseling to the bereaved.

20.  INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS

  • Mission Area: Response, Recovery

  • Description: Stabilize critical infrastructure functions, minimize health and safety threats, and efficiently restore and revitalize systems and services to support a viable, resilient community.

21. MASS CARE SERVICES

  • Mission Area: Response

  • Description: Provide life-sustaining services to the affected population with a focus on hydration, feeding, and sheltering to those who have the most need, as well as support for reunifying families.

22.  MASS SEARCH AND RESCUE OPERATIONS

  • Mission Area: Response

  • Description: Deliver traditional and atypical search and rescue capabilities, including personnel, services, animals, and assets to survivors in need, with the goal of saving the greatest number of endangered lives in the shortest time possible.

23.  ON-SCENE SECURITY AND PROTECTION

  • Mission Area: Response

  • Description: Ensure a safe and secure environment through law enforcement and related security and protection operations for people and communities located within affected areas and also for all traditional and atypical response personnel engaged in lifesaving and life-sustaining operations.

24. OPERATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS

  • Mission Area: Response

  • Description: Ensure the capacity for timely communications in support of security, situational awareness, and operations by any and all means available, among and between affected communities in the impact area and all response forces.

25.  PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SERVICES AND RESOURCES

  • Mission Area: Response

  • Description: Provide essential public and private services and resources to the affected population and surrounding communities, to include emergency power to critical facilities, fuel support for emergency responders, and access to community staples (e.g., grocery stores, pharmacies, and banks) and fire and other first response services.

26. PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES

  • Mission Area: Response

  • Description: Provide lifesaving medical treatment via emergency medical services and related operations and avoid additional disease and injury by providing targeted public health and medical support and products to all people in need within the affected area.

27.  SITUATIONAL ASSESSMENT

  • Mission Area: Response

  • Description: Provide all decision makers with decision-relevant information regarding the nature and extent of the hazard, any cascading effects, and the status of the response.

28.  ECONOMIC RECOVERY

  • Mission Area: Recovery

  • Description: Return economic and business activities (including food and agriculture) to a healthy state and develop new business and employment opportunities that result in a sustainable and economically viable community.

29.  HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES

  • Mission Area: Recovery

  • Description: Restore and improve health and social services networks to promote the resilience, independence, health (including behavioral health), and well-being of the whole community.

30.  HOUSING

  • Mission Area: Recovery

  • Description: Implement housing solutions that effectively support the needs of the whole community and contribute to its sustainability and resilience.

31.  NATURAL AND CULTURAL RESOURCES

  • Mission Area: Recovery

  • Description: Protect natural and cultural resources and historic properties through appropriate planning, mitigation, response, and recovery actions to preserve, conserve, rehabilitate, and restore them consistent with post-disaster community priorities and best practices and in compliance with appropriate environmental and historical preservation laws and executive orders

CEDP Exam Outline

  1. History of Emergency Management and Disaster Response

  2. Federal Legislation Relevant to Emergency Management and Homeland Security

  3. Presidential Directives Related to Emergency Management

  4. Federal Regulatory Agencies (DHS, FEMA, DHHS, OSHA, EPA, DOT, FCC, CDC, ASTDR, NIOSH, AHRQ, etc.)

  5. Voluntary and Standards Agencies (NFPA, ANSI, ASTM, ASHRAE, Red Cross, etc.)

  6. Emergency Management and All-Hazards Planning (Emergency Operations Plan)

  7. Business Continuity & NFPA 1600

  8. Emergency Planning & NIMS

  9.  Understanding Systems and Standardization

  10. Incident Command Systems (ICS) Organization and Structure

  11. Communication Support (Telecommunications Service Priority (TSP) Program, Government Emergency Telecommunications Service (GETS) Program, and Wireless Priority Service (WPS)

  12. Incident Action Planning & Multi-Agency Coordination (Area & Unified Commands)

  13. Weather and Other Natural Disasters (floods, thunderstorms, tropical storms, earthquakes, etc.)

  14. Technological and Transportation Emergencies

  15. Civil Disturbances and Bomb Threats

  16. Information Technology and Cyber Attack Emergencies

  17. Related Emergency Concepts and Terms (safety, management, organizational culture, etc.)

  18. OSHA Emergency Terms & National Response Framework Terms

  19. Managing Hazardous Materials & Wastes

  20. EPA Laws and Standards

  21. OSHA & HAZWOPER Requirements

  22. Industrial/Agricultural Chemical Decontamination

  23. Life Safety and Egress (NFPA 101-2000, NFPA 99, etc.)

  24. Planning for Terrorism & Terrorism Agents  

  25. Pandemic Planning

  26. Current Events and New Developments

  27. Lessons Learned from Previous Events


Example Questions

1. Which concept relates to the supervisory structure of the organization and pertains to the number of individuals or resources one incident supervisor can manage effectively?

a. Delegation of authority

b. Span of control*

c. Form follows function

d. Unity of command

 

2. Which agency regulates transport of hazardous materials through pipelines?

a. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration

b. The Department of Commerce

c. The Environmental Protection Agency

d. The Department of Transportation*

 

3. Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5 required DHS to create which of the following?

a. Federal Response Plan

b. Incident Command System

c. National Incident Management System*

d. Integrated Emergency Management System

 

4. Which of the following actions would have the most impact on how an organization responds to emergency situations in their community?

a. Conducting and evaluating disaster drills as required by DHS and FEMA

b. Conducting a thorough Hazard Vulnerability Analysis to ensure proper planning*

c. Appointing an organizational emergency coordinator as a liaison with the local EMA

d. Appointing a representative to participate in LEPC meetings and exercises

 

5. Which Federal publication codifies DHS and FEMA standards or guidelines?

a. The Congressional Record (CR)

b. The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)*

c. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Manual (RCRA)

d. The Federal Register (FR)